Inside the old kitchen #1 What did the inhabitants of the Commonwealth eat?

Inside the old kitchen #1 What did the inhabitants of the Commonwealth eat?

Foreign cuisine always fascinates us. Intuitively, we know what to expect from French, Portuguese, or Italian cuisine. In the past centuries, just like today, learning about culinary habits was an essential part of the journey. Let’s sneak into the old kitchen and see what inhabitants of the Polish-Lithuanian  Commonwealth did eat!

The strongest fortress of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth

The strongest fortress of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth

Kamianets-Podilskyi/Kamieniec Podolski: one of the most important fortresses of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. This castle was substantial in keeping the southern borders of the country safe against the Turkish and Tatar forces. Around the stronghold grew a city, surrounded by waters of Smotrych River.

The epitaph of the Scottish trader

The epitaph of the Scottish trader

Saints Peter and Paul Church located in the Old Suburb of Gdańsk was an important place of interest for the Calvinist Scottish diaspora. The Scottish immigrants in their search for a better future often chose Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth as a new home. The history of this Celtic nation in Poland is, without a doubt, an extremely interesting chapter in the history of our country.

The first multi-legged cable car was built in 1644, and it worked perfectly

The first multi-legged cable car was built in 1644, and it worked perfectly

The first cable car in the world was built in Gdańsk in 1644, then part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. City engineer Adam Wybe constructed this mechanism to facilitate fortification work carried out at the city’s ramparts. The machine was admired not only by the townspeople but also by numerous travelers from all over the world.